Monday, November 12, 2018

Luther on Psalm 22 by Dr. Roland Bainton

Psalm 22
“Luther began his career as a teacher by lecturers on the Psalms.  When he came to the 22nd he encountered the verse, “My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken me?” quoted by Christ on the cross.  Luther was astounded.  Christ forsaken! That’s exactly the way I have felt, and I thought I was the only one in all the history of the world.  But, why?  I am weak.  I am sinful.  He was not weak.  He was not sinful.  How then could it be!?  It could only be because He so identified Himself with our sinful humanity, as for the moment to feel himself on our side as over against God.  What a difference this picture is of Christ.  He who was seen as the judge upon the rainbow condemning now has now become the derelict upon the cross redeeming.   For Luther, the thought was well expressed by Saint Paul in the Epistle to the Romans that we are not right with God with anything we can do, but only by our acceptance, our belief, our commitment to God’s holy unmerited grace.  And Luther said he felt through this insight as if the very gates of Paradise were opened.”      --Dr. Roland Bainton


By Saint Paul in the Epistle to the Romans

Saturday, October 13, 2018

1 Peter 5:5b-7 - Thoughts for 181014PM@TBC

1 Peter 5:5b-7 English Standard Version (ESV)

5  ...Clothe yourselves, all of you, with humility toward one another, for “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.”
Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of God so that at the proper time he may exalt you, casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you.

While context is important, verse 5b seems to begin a new thought with an imperative.

1. "ALL OF YOU" --This describes a general characteristic that applies to all

2. "CLOTHE"  Middle imperative / clothe yourselves
The word speaks of a servant's apron or some garment that would be tied around the waist.
Reminiscent of John 13 where Jesus
"...and taking a towel, tied it around his waist. Then he poured water into a basin and began to wash the disciples' feet and to wipe them with the towel that was wrapped around him."  
Peter must have remembered the fuss he put up to Jesus when it was his turn to have his feet washed.

(...occurs in the NT only in 1 Pet. 5:5, where it has the figurative sense “to make one’s essential characteristic.” Humility is to be a decisive mark of Christian conduct.)
Gerhard Kittel, Gerhard Friedrich, and Geoffrey William Bromiley, Theological Dictionary of the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans, 1985), 196.

2. HUMILITY ---  In this context, it primarily stands in contrast to those who exalt themselves when in a crisis to secure their own interests, with no trust in the Lord or concern for others.
(When were are paralyzed by care/anxiety, we turn inward and are preoccupied with ourselves at the expense of concern for others.)
Philippians 2
Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.

3. QUOTATION from Proverbs 3:34
Notice how the admonition to not envy the man of violence fits with the context of suffering in 1 Peter.
The picture is drawn of a man who is violent, devious, and plain wicked. Note the progressing intensity in 32-36.  The scorner indicates someone who is hardened and bold in their opposition to the Lord and toward others.

Proverbs 3.31-
31 31 Do not envy a man of violence
    and do not choose any of his ways,

32 32 for the devious person is an abomination to the Lord,
    but the upright are in his confidence.

33 33 The Lord's curse is on the house of the wicked,
    but he blesses the dwelling of the righteous.

34 34 Toward the scorners he is scornful,
    but to the humble he gives favor. 

35 35 The wise will inherit honor,
    but fools get disgrace.


4. OPPOSES
The word “proud” is the translation of a Greek word which means literally “to show above,” and thus describes the proud person as one who shows himself above others.
Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 127.

Lit., setteth himself in array against, as one draws out a host for battle.
Marvin Richardson Vincent, Word Studies in the New Testament, vol. 1 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887), 668.

God opposes (resists) those who set themselves up as independent of God, as not needing God, and are hardened in disbelief and distrust.

5.  HUMBLE - passive voice/imperative  “Be humbled” - ”permit yourselves to be humbled”--Wuest
"Submission is an act of faith. We are trusting God to direct in our lives and to work out His purposes in His time."
Warren W. Wiersbe, The Bible Exposition Commentary, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996), 431.

6. THE MIGHTY HAND OF GOD  --A frequent symbol of God's delivering power in the Old  Testament.
Deuteronomy 7:8 
but it is because the Lord loves you and is keeping the oath that he swore to your fathers, that the Lord has brought you out with a mighty hand and redeemed you from the house of slavery, from the hand of Pharaoh king of Egypt.

When we humble ourselves under his mighty hand,
     we are abandoning our self-sufficiency to take care of ourselves first
     and trust His strong hand to both lead and protect us.

7. IN DUE TIME
The key, of course, is the phrase “in due time.” God never exalts anyone until that person is ready for it. First the cross, then the crown; first the suffering, then the glory. ... One of the evidences of our pride is our impatience with God, and one reason for suffering is that we might learn patience (James 1:1–6). Here Peter was referring to words he heard the Master say: “For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted” (Luke 14:11).
Warren W. Wiersbe, The Bible Exposition Commentary, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996), 432.

8. YOUR CARE/ANXIETY  singular  (RSV, ESV, NET, NLT anxieties, plurals)
Wuest clarifies it ...having deposited with Him once for all the whole of your worry
NOTE:  having deposited -- It speaks of a one-time act, a change of attitude.
NOTE:  the whole of your worries  While we will bring many requests (i.e. Phil. 4.5-6) this verse speaks of a general decision and attitude of trust in the Lord.

APPLICATIONS:
1. "Anxiety is a self-contradiction to true humility. Unbelief is, in a sense, an exalting of self against God in that one is depending upon self and failing to trust God." --Kenneth S. Wuest

The humility in this passage that we clothe ourselves with is steeped in the patient trust in God to care for us.  It is the attitude that protects us from preoccupation with our concerns to the exclusion of others.

2.
     It so happens that egkombousthai (GSN1463) is used of another kind of garment. It is also used of putting on a long, stole-like garment which was the sign of honour and preeminence.
     To complete the picture we must put both images together. Jesus once put on the slave's apron and undertook the humblest of all duties, washing his disciples' feet; so we must in all things put on the apron of humility in the service of Christ and of our fellow-men; but that very apron of humility will become the garment of honour for us, for it is he who is the servant of all who is greatest in the Kingdom of Heaven.  --Barclay, William. The Letters of James and Peter. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 2017.







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5.
clothed
· ... comes from a word referring to the apron that slaves put on over their regular clothes.  This garment prepared them for service…”  —Thomas Constable
· “...the figure carries an exhortation to put on humility as a working virtue employed in ministry.”    —Marvin Vincent
· Proverbs 3.34 quote
· A proud man cuts himself off from God’s favor and enablement.

v.6
· Wuest”permit yourselves to be humbled”
· “First aorist passive imperative of   [tapeinoo], old verb, for which see Matt. 18:4. Peter here is in the role of a preacher of humility.  Be humbled.’  “  —A.T. Robertson

v.7
· 5:7This verse does not introduce a new command but explains how to humble oneself: by entrusting oneself and one’s troubles to God (Ps. 55:22; cf. Matt. 6:25-34; Phil. 4:6). We can do this because we have confidence that God cares for our welfare.”  —Thomas Constable
· “These Christians were undergoing such persecution that the circumstances in which they found themselves gave abundant opportunity for that sin called worry.   —K. Wuest
· casting
“The aorist participle denoting an act once for all; throwing the whole life with its care on him.”  —Marvin Vincent


Wednesday, October 10, 2018

AWANA Witness teaching notes / Tulsa Bible Church 18.10.10

---------------------------Worksheet
CORE CONCEPT:  God’s design for creation was
                                                        , and                     .
CORE VERSE: Matthew 5:48  (Never read one Bible verse.)
What’s the context (vv. 43-45)?
What’s the key word in this verse? 

What’s the Old Testament allusion? 
CORE CONTENT: Genesis 1:10, 12, 18, 25, 26-27, & 31
What do verses 10, 12, 18, 25, & 31 all have in common?
What does “ ” mean in this chapter?

imago dei


LOOKING AHEAD:
Romans 8.18-25 (esp. 22-23)
Matthew 6.10  
SUMMARY
“The command is to be who God designed and desires you to be.”
 “The command to be perfect is a command to make God’s future kingdom a present reality.”
MISCONCEPTION: God didn’t create the world as well as he should have.
If God is completely sovereign and powerful, then couldn’t He have created a world absent of sin and given us all the paradise we long for?  Instead He allowed us to be born in sin.  Psalm 51:5
ILLUMINATION: Humanity is responsible for sin and losing paradise, yet God is actively working to invite us back in.  Romans 12.2; Ephesians 4.17-24; 5.1 (also Revelation 22.1-3)
———————————————————————————————————————————-———————————————————————————————————————————-———————————————————————————————————————————-
THOT QUESTIONS:         
· What do people usually mean when they say someone is a “good person.”  Is it possible to be morally perfect?  Why?
· What does being made in the “image and likeness of God” tell us about what God thinks about us and what our purpose is?           (Who made you?  Does God make mistakes?)




---------------------------------------Teaching Notes
CORE CONCEPT:  God’s design for creation was
goodnessbeauty, and perfection.

CORE VERSE: Matthew 5:48  (Never read one Bible verse.)
What’s the context (vv. 43-45)?    (and parallel passage in Luke 6:36)
What’s the key word in this verse? 
τέλος G5046 - teleios
properly, brought to its end, finished; lacking nothing necessary to completeness;
substantively (as a noun), that which is perfect: consummate human integrity and virtue, Romans 12:2 (others take it here as an adjective belonging to θέλημα); the perfect state of all things
of men, full-grown, adult; of full age, mature   
What’s the Old Testament allusion?   Leviticus 19:2
1Pe 1:15-16  but as he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, since it is written, “You shall be holy, for I am holy.”
Lev 19:2  Speak to all the congregation of the people of Israel and say to them, You shall be holy,* for I the LORD your God am holy.*
*H6918 – qadowsh / kä·dōshe' --sacred, holy, Holy One, saint, set apart
“The command is to be who God designed and desires you to be.”

CORE CONTENT: Genesis 1:10, 12, 18, 25, 26-27, & 31
What do verses 10, 12, 18, 25, & 31 all have in common?
What does “good” mean in this chapter?
See the core concept.
טוֹב ṭôwb, tobe; from H2895; good (as an adjective) in the widest sense;

imago dei
- refers to the unique imprint God placed upon humanity, identifying people as a special creation.   http://www.religionfacts.com/imago-dei
 1923a             צֶלֶם (ṣelem) image.
Used sixteen times. The Aramaic is used similarly in Dan 2 and 3. The word basically refers to a representation, a likeness. Five times it is used of man as created in the image of God. Twice it is used of the golden copies of the mice and swellings that afflicted the Philistines (I Sam 6:5, 11 and see ʿōpel). Mostly it refers to an idol.[1]
1823 דְּמוּת [dâmuwth /dem·ooth/] LIKENESS  [2]To be like, resemble; to become like; to compare, liken
 [1] R. Laird Harris, Gleason L. Archer Jr., and Bruce K. Waltke, eds., Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (Chicago: Moody Press, 1999), 767.
[2] James Strong, Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon (Woodside Bible Fellowship, 1995). 

LOOKING AHEAD:
Romans 8.18-25 (esp. 22-23)  
22 For we know that the whole creation groans and labors with birth pangs together until now. 23 Not only that, but we also who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, eagerly waiting for the adoption, the redemption of our body. 24 For we were saved in this hope, but hope that is seen is not hope; for why does one still hope for what he sees? 25 But if we hope for what we do not see, we eagerly wait for it with perseverance. (NKJV)
22 For we know that all creation has been groaning as in the pains of childbirth right up to the present time. 23 And we believers also groan, even though we have the Holy Spirit within us as a foretaste of future glory, for we long for our bodies to be released from sin and suffering. We, too, wait with eager hope for the day when God will give us our full rights as his adopted children, including the new bodies he has promised us.  24 We were given this hope when we were saved. (If we already have something, we don’t need to hope for it.  (NLT)
Matthew 6.10  on earth as it is in heaven


SUMMARY
“The command is to be who God designed and desires you to be.”
 “The command to be perfect is a command to make God’s future kingdom a present reality.”


MISCONCEPTION: God didn’t create the world as well as he should have.
If God is completely sovereign and powerful, then couldn’t He have created a world absent of sin and given us all the paradise we long for?  Instead He allowed us to be born in sin.  Psalm 51:5
ILLUMINATION: Humanity is responsible for sin and losing paradise, yet God is actively working to invite us back in.  Romans 12.2; Ephesians 4.17-24; 5.1 (also Revelation 22.1-3)

THOT QUESTIONS:         
· What do people usually mean when they say someone is a “good person.”  Is it possible to be morally perfect?  Why?
· What does being made in the “image and likeness of God” tell us about what God thinks about us and what our purpose is?           (Who made you?  Does God make mistakes?)

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Genesis 1:26–31. function of people. ...In the ancient Near East, the gods created for themselves—the world was their environment for their enjoyment and existence. People were created only as an afterthought, when the gods needed slave labor to help provide the conveniences of life (such as irrigation trenches). In the Bible the cosmos was created and organized to function on behalf of the people that God planned as the centerpiece of his creation.
Victor Harold Matthews, Mark W. Chavalas, and John H. Walton, The IVP Bible Background Commentary: Old Testament, electronic ed. (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2000), Ge 1:26–31.
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Theopedia   Imagio dei

Biblical narrative

Although the concept of the image of God is not treated at much length in the pages of Scripture, its chief appearance is in the New Testament, where an apparent problem has been solved. We shall look at some of the Scriptural evidence regarding this theme in order to see what we can say about the initial state, the problem, and its solution.

Image created

Then God said, "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth." So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them.\ Gen. 1:26–27
The opening chapter of Genesis records for us that God created humanity "in the image of God". For centuries, theologians have debated precisely what it means to be "the image of God"; the majority interpretation has been in terms of spirituality, although other proposals have included dominion (intertestamental Judaism), original righteousness ( Luther) and even sexuality ( Barth)!^[1]^ However we interpret the idea of man's being in the image of God, it brings with it certain other facts, which may help to illumine what this idea means.
We are the image of God, and therefore we are to remain humble. No less of an issue in our modern day than in the author's, man has always desired to attain deity, seeking to declare himself more than he is. The Pharaohs of Egypt declared themselves the sons of the gods, and modern society can sound like the pagans of old, telling us to search for the god inside ourselves. But from the beginning, Genesis reminds us that we are created, and we are created as images. An image is never the same as the reality, and we are only the image because God is the ultimate reality.
We are the image of God, and therefore rule as his appointed representatives. The command to have dominion over creation and to subdue it is an explicitly-stated consequence of our role as the image of God. God, as Creator, is the Sovereign Lord of creation, and we, as his image, are his viceroys. And yet we are to rule as God himself would rule. There is no room here for a tyrannical ruling of creation; if the God who made us his viceroys is the God of all grace and compassion, then our rule over nature should reflect his rule.
We are the image of God, and therefore human beings are worthy of respect. We shall explore the development of this theme a little further later on, but it is the case that the creation story leaves us in no doubt: every human being is created in the image of God, without exception or distinction.
We are the image of God, and therefore murder is unconscionably evil. To destroy plant life would be wanton and careless, to destroy animal life, cruel. But to destroy the life of another human being is to destroy an image-bearer of God, an offence against the one whose image is borne. It is for this reason that the penalty for murder is given as death in Gen. 9:6.
https://www.theopedia.com/image-of-god
Also see:
https://www.desiringgod.org/articles/the-image-of-god
https://www.gotquestions.org/image-of-God.html